August 24*, 25, 26, 31, September 1, 2, 7*, 8, 9 @ 7:30 pm

$20 Adults, $18 Seniors/Students/Military, $10 Youth
* Value nights ~ All tickets $10

Two young lovers are cursed to be on opposite sides in a fierce feud between rival families. Tragically, it takes the sacrifice of their promising lives for the rivals to put aside their differences. Through the heartbreak, Shakespeare brings some of the most beautiful and lyrical love poetry to life.

The show will end at approximately 10:15 PM.

Please note that there is a $5 park entrance fee per vehicle. It’s free if you have a state park sticker.

“Kudos to all the cast and crew, but special praise to Director Dustin J. Martin for assembling such a talented group of collaborators. Together you provided a delightful experience for us. Shakespeare has again given us food for thought and hours of enjoyment, and this particular group of dramatic artists, a night to remember.!”
Julie McHale – TimeOut Theater Critic

Read the review

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Romeo & Juliet Calendar

ROMEO & JULIET

by William Shakespeare
edited and adapted by Dustin J. Martin

Dramatis Personae
Romeo………………………………………………………………………………………..JJ Gatesman
Montague, his father…………………………………………………………………….Jim Mallmann
Lady Montague, his mother…………………………………………………………Louise Sausen
Benvolio, their kinsman……………………………………………………………… James Sevens
Adriana, a Montague servant……………………………………………………….Maura Atwood
Juliet………………………………………………………………………………………….Kara Penrose
Capulet, her father…………………………………………………………………………James Ryan
Lady Capulet, her mother…………………………………………………………… Donna Daniels
Nurse to Juliet…………………………………………………………………………Victoria Hudziak
Tybalt, kinsman to the Capulets……………………………………………………Phil Stepanski
Sam, a Capulet servant……………………………………………………………… Lauren Heinen
Gregoria, a Capulet servant……………………………………………………..Jessica Kennedy
Peter, a Capulet servant……………………………………………………………….Lucas Nelson
Escalus, Prince of Verona…………………………………………………………Doug Smedbron
Paris, a young nobleman, kinsman to the Prince………………………………Luke Sausen
Mercutio, the Prince’s kinsman and Romeo’s friend…………Nicholas Callan Haubner
Friar Lawrence…………………………………………………………………………… Josh Scheibe
Friar John………………………………………………………………………………….Phil Stepanski
Apothecary…………………………………………………………………………………Lucas Nelson
First Watch………………………………………………………………………………..Maura Atwood
Second Watch………………………………………………………………………….. Lauren Heinen
Third Watch……………………………………………………………………………Jessica Kennedy

Production Staff
Director……………………………………………………………………………………Dustin J. Martin
Stage Manager…………………………………………………………………………….Merry Jaeger
Set Designer………………………………………………………………………….Christopher Kurtz
Master Carpenter……………………………………………………………………… Anthony Lauer
Assistant Director……………………………………………………………… Katie Lynne Krueger
Fight Director………………………………………………………………………………Kara Penrose
Assistant Stage Manager……………………………………………………………….. Leah Teske
Properties Designer………………………………………………………………………….Erica Ziino
Costume Designer……………………………………………………………………Dana Brzezinski
Light and Sound Designer…………………………………………………………..Chris Meissner

Scenes
The play takes place over five days in present day Verona.

There will be one 15-minute intermission.

The audio or video recording of this performance by any means whatsoever is strictly prohibited.

Director’s Notes

If someone is asked to name a play by William Shakespeare, one of the titles that would be answered most frequently is ROMEO AND JULIET. Numerous film versions, adaptations, and derivations exist. Lines from this play are in the general consciousness of the culture. Lines such as “O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo” and “Parting is such sweet sorrow” and “But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks?” are known and quoted with regularity. The play is well known as a love story, and to be sure, it is. Romeo and Juliet as the starcrossed lovers are the centerpiece of this tragedy and their scenes are some of the most powerful ever written. However, when you move past this story line, you see the feud that existed between the Montagues and the Capulets that forced Romeo and Juliet to be secretive in their love and, ultimately, to take their own lives. In a manner of speaking, Romeo and Juliet are at odds with the previous generation – their parents.

As I studied the play in preparation for this production, Romeo and Juliet’s character qualities reminded me of the millennial generation. Whenever a generation comes of age, they seem to take the brunt of everyone else’s scorn. This certainly was the case when my generation – Generation X – came on the scene before being brushed aside for the millennials.

Therefore, I decided to set the play in present day to help contrast the generational differences between Romeo, Juliet, and their friends with their parents and others in authority. Despite cellphones today being ubiquitous, I chose to not incorporate them to maintain the focus on the text and the timelessness of the themes.

The story ends tragically for Juliet and Romeo, and it takes their deaths to begin to heal wounds between the Capulets and Montagues. In this fractured time in which we live, let us find ways to bridge the gaps with those with whom we feud.

Dustin J. Martin, Director

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